Freedom Daily Archive

The Road Ahead

by
We must now go back to fundamentals. Our fathers gave to the world the sublime example of statesmen who had found the means of casting off the tyrant State and building up the sovereign people — unleashing the energies of free men. It was this historic experiment which set off that astonishing surge of human energy which created here ... [click for more]

Book Review: Russia’s Last Capitalists

by
Russia's Last Capitalists: The Nepmen, 1921-1929 by Alan M. Ball (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990); 226 pages; $11.95. In 1921, Russia was in a state of economic and social collapse. The country had undergone three years of the First world war — between 1914 and 1917. In November 1917, the Bolsheviks, under Lenin's leadership, overthrew the Provisional Government that had ruled ... [click for more]

Players and Pawns: The Persian Gulf War

by
For the greater part of this century, the United States government has plundered, looted, and terrorized the American people through the Internal Revenue Service. It has surreptitiously stolen people's income and savings through the Federal Reserve System. It has brutally enforced — through fines and imprisonment — rules and regulations governing people's peaceful economic activities. In a very real ... [click for more]

A New World Order: Economic Liberalism or the New Mercantilism

by
In the days immediately following the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, the Bush Administration declared that a vital interest of the United States was at stake. American economic wellfbeing was threatened by Iraqi control of the Kuwaiti oil fields. However, when a growing number of economists pointed out that the U.S. economy had the capacity to adjust ... [click for more]

Some Other Costs of War

by
War always increases State power over the economy, and the Gulf war is no exception. Thus one of President Bush's first actions was, by executive fiat, to give himself total control over any corporation or industry, if he deems it necessary for the war effort. He can now requisition what he wants, without regard ... [click for more]

We’d Rather Fight

by
We're a peace-loving people — everybody says so. Well, maybe not everybody, but we sure say so. Hardly a week goes by without one of our national leaders referring to Americans as a peace-loving people. What can they be thinking of? In the past fifty years, we have fought four major wars; that is, wars that ... [click for more]

Book Review: The Hidden Nations

by
The Hidden Nations: The People Challenge the Soviet Union by Nadia Diuk and Adrian Karatnycky (New York: William Morrow and Co., Inc. 1990); 284 pages; $22.95. Many of the "captive nations" of central and eastern Europe reclaimed their freedom in 1989 and 1990. Non-communist democratic governments were elected in Poland, Czechoslovakia ... [click for more]

Locking Out the Immigrant

by
America of the 1800s was the most unique society in the history of man. People could engage in virtually any economic enterprise without permission of their public officials. People could become as wealthy as they want, and there was nothing the government could do about it. They could dispose of their ... [click for more]

In Defense of Free Migration

by
Not long after the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, Thomas Jefferson wrote of "the natural right which 0 men have of relinquishing the country in which birth or other accident may have thrown them, and seeking subsistence and happiness wheresoever they may be able, and hope to find them. For most of America's history, our country's door was ... [click for more]

A Capitalist Looks at Free Trade

by
Protectionists seeking relief from the rigors of foreign competition bring to mind Milton Friedman's dictum, "The great enemies of face enterprise are businessmen and intellectuals — businessmen because they want socialism for themselves and free enterprise for everyone else; intellectuals, because they want free enterprise for themselves and socialism for everyone else." I speak from personal experience. Baseball-glove leather was ... [click for more]

Man’s Mobility

by
Mobility of goods and services is an elaboration or extension of man's own mobility. It cannot be said that man has mobility except as the manifestations of his labors are free to move.... That the general welfare is served by the free mobility of man's goods and services domestically is generally ... [click for more]

Book Review: Soviet Civilization

by
Soviet Civilization: A Cultural History by Andrei Sinyavsky (New York: Arcade Publishing, 1990); 291 pages; $24.95. At the height of the great purges in the Soviet Union during the 1930s, Stalin personally sent instructions to the Soviet secret police which stated that in obtaining confessions from the accused, "the NKVD was given permission by the Central Committee ... [click for more]
Page 149 of 156« First...102030...147148149150151...Last »