Regulation Policy & Welfare

The Antitrust Absurdity

by
The Federal Trade Commission has aimed its antitrust cannon at Intel Corp., maker of the microprocessor used in 90 percent of personal computers. The FTC charges Intel with refusing to provide information about its chips to certain computer makers with which it has legal disputes. At first, it ... [click for more]

The So-Called Right to Strike

by
In several of the highly publicized strikes in recent years, including the strikes against Caterpillar and the Detroit newspapers, company management continued operations during the strike by hiring permanent replacement workers. Permanent replacements are hired not just for the duration of the strike but to continue on after the strike ... [click for more]

To Create Order, Remove the Planner

by
Which came first, the chicken of economics or the egg of economic action? Did the discipline of economics precede the object of its interest? The obvious answer is no. To say yes would be like saying that astronomy preceded the planets and stars or that before Newton, apples didn't fall from trees. Yet, there are people who speak as though ... [click for more]

Needed: The Separation of Cable and State

by
There is growing political manipulation of the information that the average American is allowed to receive. Americans long ridiculed the Soviet-bloc media for presenting absurdly self-serving images of their government. Yet, in this country, thanks to government controls over cable television, most American cable subscribers are forced to bankroll multiple television stations that ... [click for more]

Punishing Success

by
Let's cut to the chase: It's Microsoft's property. The company should be free to offer it on any terms it wishes. If people don't want to buy Microsoft products, they don't have to. As long as no law keeps other people from offering competing products, no one need ... [click for more]

Hair Today, Fairness Tomorrow

by
It is a mystery to me why egalitarians have failed to decry the unequal and unfair distribution of one of the most important assets in all of society. It is all the more perplexing because the unfairness of the distribution is plain for all to see. Walk down any street, and there it is. Toleration of this egregious violation ... [click for more]

What They Don’t Know

by
Vice President Al Gore says that if the tax on cigarettes is raised $1.10 a pack in the next five years, teenage smoking will drop 42 percent on average nationwide. Not 41 or 43 percent. Forty-two percent. Further, he says that 991,000 deaths from smoking would be avoided. ... [click for more]

Recall the Government Meat Inspectors

by
The record recall of hamburger meat from the Hudson Foods plant in Nebraska last year should prompt us to ask whether the government should be certifying the safety of America's food supply. Let's face it, food is too important to be left to government. For many people, that may come as a shock. Doesn't the E. coli-contaminated beef show that ... [click for more]

Service to Whom? Part 2

by
Part 1 | Part 2 A more subtle problem is the long-term effect of federal funding on the volunteer groups and those who normally support volunteer groups. To some it might seem hard to criticize grants to organizations such as Habitat for Humanity (which until recently refused to accept government funding), Big Brothers-Big Sisters, and the Red Cross. These ... [click for more]

Sovietizing American Virtue

by
"The higher interest involved in the life of the whole must set the limits and lay down the duties of the individual," according to Adolf Hitler. Hitler's views are generally unpopular in the United States. However, some of his moral dogmas may be staging a comeback. At the Volunteer Summit in ... [click for more]
Page 24 of 31« First...10...2223242526...30...Last »